Articles Tagged: Legal-News


FTC Cracking Down on Drug Manufacturers' "Pay-for-Delay" Practices

On March 30th, the Federal Trade Commission filed a lawsuit against drug manufacturer Endo Pharmaceuticals, alleging that Endo is paying generic drug manufacturers in order to delay the release of lower cost generic versions of their drugs, Opana ER and Lidoderm.

Generic drugs come to market when the patents on name brand drugs expire.
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Apple v. Samsung is SCOTUS's First Design Patent Case in 122 Years


The Supreme Court announced Monday that it would agree to hear part of an appeal filed by Samsung seeking to overturn a $548 million damages award granted to Apple last year. Aside from finally closing the door on this five-year saga between Apple and Samsung, SCOTUS’s decision is newsworthy because it’s the first case before the Court involving design patents since 1894. See Dunlop v. Schofield, 152 U.S. 244 (1894).

The Court agreed to hear arguments regarding whether Samsung is liable for all profits from the sale of phones that infringed on Apple’s design patents, totaling $399 million dollars, or whether they are liable only for the portion of those profits attributable to the role those protected design elements played in actual phone sales.
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When the Government Shuts Down: Third Party Data Providers Step Up


From August 29 to September 6, 2015, servers operated by the United States Copyright Office, were down. For more than eight days, hundreds of applicants had to jump through hoops to file a copyright.

The Copyright Office’s electronic filing system, known as “eCO”, was taken offline “to accommodate a scheduled annual power outage to allow routine maintenance by the Architect of the Capitol,” according to the Office.However, at the end of the blackout period, the Library’s information technology office could not bring the servers back online, along with several other Library managed government sites.
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Victory for SpaceX: PTAB Cancels Blue Origin Patent


In a victory for aerospace company SpaceX, the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) issued a decision on August 27th canceling 13 claims in a rocket sea-landing patent owned by competitor Blue Origin, a space venture backed by Amazon’s Jeff Bezos.

The patent at issue, U.S. Patent No. 8,678,321 B2 (the “’321 patent”), describes a method of vertically landing a rocket booster on a floating platform after launch.
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War of the Fitness Trackers: Adidas v. Under Armour

Back in February of 2014, German sportswear giant Adidas filed a patent infringement suit against competitor Under Armour, Inc. in United States District Court for the District of Delaware.

Adidas accused Under Armour and its newly acquired fitness tracker subsidiary, MapMyFitness, Inc., of infringing ten of its patents.
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Rapper and Mogul 50 Cent Files for Bankruptcy


50 Cent’s moniker has ceased being figurative— the rapper and business mogul has filed for bankruptcy in Connecticut’s Bankruptcy Court.

Curtis James Jackson III, known by his stage name “50 Cent” or “Fiddy”, started his career as a successful rap artist, rising to the top of the charts and taking in millions of dollars in royalties annually.
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Get the Fastest SCOTUS News Alerts, Such As the Court's Recent Same Sex Marriage Decision



On July 26, the Supreme Court ruled in Obergefell v. Hodges that states must recognize same-sex marriage. The long awaited decision was 5-4, with Justice Kennedy casting the swing vote in favor of upholding same-sex unions. In his opinion for the majority, Kennedy wrote:

No union is more profound than marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice, and family.
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Saint Laurent Does Not Find Your Parody Funny

Creating a parody of a well-recognized brand is a popular way to captivate the public, à la the “Dumb Starbucks” phenomenon that took the internet by storm last year and had LA residents lining up around the block for a cup of “dumb coffee.”

But is this type of witty commentary legal? Well, as any lawyer will tell you, it depends.

Parody can be raised as a defense to a trademark or copyright infringement lawsuit.
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Know Your PTAB Judges: Meet PTAB Judge Trevor Jefferson


In the News: Docket Alarm is excited to announce that we have been selected as a finalist in Legaltech News’ Innovation Awards for Best Research Product! The award is in recognition of outstanding achievement by legal professionals in their use of technology.

Know Your PTAB Judges: Meet PTAB Judge Trevor Jefferson

In this installment of Docket Alarm’s Know Your PTAB Judge newsletter, Docket Alarm is proud to feature Administrative Patent Judge Trevor Jefferson.
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War of the Drones: Parrot to Pay $7.8M in Patent Infringement Lawsuit


Last week, a Pennsylvania jury handed down one of the first patent infringement verdicts involving drones. Drone Technologies Inc. filed suit against France-based Parrot SA for infringement on two of their patents, U.S. Patents 7,584,071and 8,106,748.

Parrot is a well-known drone manufacturing company, focusing primarily on the toy and hobby market.

The jury ruled in favor of Drone Technologies Inc., granting $7.8 million in damages.
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Taylor Swift Capitalizes on Trademark Applications to Protect Her Brand


Taylor Swift has been raising eyebrows recently, but not for the reasons you may think. This time, instead of the 25-year-old pop star’s love life being the topic of discussion, it’s her recent legal activity. Swift Co has filed more than 37 federal trademark applications in the past six months, setting off a firestorm of speculation.

Swift’s applications seek protection for phrases like “this sick beat,” “Party like it’s 1989,” and “nice to meet you, where you been?” Many of these phrases are actually lyrics from her immensely popular songs.
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Law360 Announces Intellectual Property MVPs for 2014




Docket Alarm would like to congratulate this year’s Law360 Intellectual Property MVPs. The 2014 class includes both veterans and up-and-comers, with almost all of the recipients having practices focused on patent litigation.

Daralyn Durie | Durie Tangri

Daralyn Durie is a San Francisco-based patent litigator, whose clients include some of the biggest names in tech: Google, Twitter, LinkedIn and Genentech. Recently, she has received several honors in addition to being a Law360 MVP— Chambers Partners named her one of the top 25 patent litigators in California and American Lawyer named her one of the top 50 litigators under age 45 in the United States.
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One of YouTube's Biggest Stars Fights Back in Copyright Lawsuit


Self-made mogul Michelle Phan is embroiled in a legal battle over her use of music in her popular YouTube videos.

Phan’s legal troubles began in July when music label, Ultra Records, filed a suit against her for copyright infringement. Ultra alleged Phan used songs and compilations owned by the label as background music for her YouTube videos without first obtaining a license to do so. Phan has respondedto Ultra’s complaint, and has also filed a counterclaim, stating that, although she did use some of the songs and compilations in question, her use is pursuant to an agreement she had with the label.
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How the Other "Green" Economy Is Affecting Intellectual Property


The legalization of recreational marijuana in Colorado and Washington has lead to many novel intellectual property issues.

For example, in March 2014, a new state tax was proposed that would on Washington marijuana-related businesses seeking IP protection. Specifically, a tax of $3.60 would be assessed per $1000 of value of a business’s IP assets, including trademarks, trade names, brands, patents, and copyrights related to marijuana. The intended purpose of the tax is to “capitalize on [Washington’s] unique position” and use the generated revenue for agricultural research.
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Is Tesla's Open Patent Policy Encouraging Innovation?

Back in June, electric car manufacturer Tesla Motor’s CEO Elon Musk “opened up” Tesla’s patents to other car manufacturers. Now that the dust has settled, was this really the game-changing move that analysts and news outlets had predicted? And how will it affect Tesla’s recently unveiled Model D?

What Tesla’s Announcement Really Means

To explore the real reason behind Musk’s seemingly bold decision, we need to examine what the phrase “opened up” actually means in this context.
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